Blog Archives

Final Presentation – Masters of Science in Real Estate

Hey there I have attached a copy of my final presentation

Eco Municipality

I am discussing 2 organizations that I am extremely passionate about, and The Village of Shorewood WI. A municipality that really gave me an understanding of what an eco municipality is.

I am sooo soo sorry that you can barely hear the narration of this presentation, I tried several different ways to record this and it seemed this was the loudest it was going to get.

Here’s My Brain Dump:

This year I have had the hardest time trying to figure out exactly what I was going to do with all this information I have squeezed into my head, and I have decided that I am going to spend a lot of time working with Habitat for Humanities and the Oak Cliff Chamber of Commerce, I have also  decided to go ahead and train to be a General Appraiser, and of course my Chefs Garden. I recently placed a bid for an abandoned lot in East Dallas (Joppa or “Joppy”) so if all goes well it will be the home to the new Chefs Garden.

So defiantly look forward to upcoming posts involving projects going on within these organizations.

Trinity River Vision Authority- Shannon Cate

This morning I got a chance to visit with Shannon Cate, about the improvement being done along the Trinity River.

shanna-cate

Planning and Development Manager

 Shanna Cate has worked in planning on the Trinity River Vision project since May of 2004. She manages aspects related to urban planning and development, TRVA’s Fair Contracting program and coordinates a broad range of activities related to stakeholder, community and governmental relations.
Education
University of North Texas Denton, Texas, Master of Science Degree in Real Estate (August, 2005)
Tarleton State University, Stephenville, Texas, Bachelors of Business Administration Degree: Marketing Major (May, 2002)
Trinity Plan

Three bridges will span the bypass channel providing vehicles and pedestrians with access between Uptown and Northside neighborhoods.

1.5-mile-long bypass channel will be constructed to redirect flood waters around the low lying area to the north of downtown.

  • Because the bypass channel will be carrying water so quickly in times of flooding, areas where water can be stored before moving downstream will be critical. This is where valley storage comes into play. Valley storage is constructed to hold various amounts of water for short periods of time while river levels regulate after a flood.
  • Three flood gates will be installed at the portions of the river where the bypass channel and the original river intersect. These gates will remain open at most times, but can be shut during high water events – forcing water through the bypass channel.
  • A dam will be put in place near Samuels Ave. keeping the upstream water at a constant level at all times. The dam will also have a channel lock component allowing boats to travel from Marine Creek in the Stockyards all the way to Trinity Park!
Flooded homes near downtown Fort Worth in the 1949 Flood of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. Montgomery Wards department store is seen in the distance. A horse is on one of the rooftops.

Flooded homes near downtown Fort Worth in the 1949 Flood of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. Montgomery Wards department store is seen in the distance. A horse is on one of the rooftops.

Infrastructure needed for flood control will restore an aging industrial area once devoted to oil refining, scrap metal yards and electrical and chemical plants. When the bypass channel is completed, around 800 acres of underutilized land between the Tarrant County Courthouse and Northside Dr. will be accessible for private mixed-use development opportunities – in essence doubling the size of downtown. An envisioned 10,000 housing units and three million square feet of commercial, retail and educational space will make it possible for Fort Worth residents to live, work, play and learn near the river.
The Trinity Uptown plan will provide approximately 10 additional miles of pedestrian trails in the project area. These new trails will provide connectivity to existing trails and create linkages with neighborhoods and cultural amenities. The addition of new trails is concentrated largely along the east and west sides of the bypass channel and adjacent to the urban lake feature. The east side of the proposed bypass channel is envisioned as a “hard” edge with upper- and lower-level pedestrian walkways. These walkways will be hard surfaced and used for a variety of activities including walking, jogging, bicycling, and roller-blading. The west or “soft” edge of the bypass channel will be designed as a park-like natural setting with trails along a greenbelt. Picnic areas, park benches and landscaping will be used along the trails to create a place for the public to connect to the river and the environment. Trails are also planned in this section of greenbelt for horseback riding, and pedestrian bridges are proposed to provide easy access to the trail system.
What interested me the most:
Shannon mentioned they were creating Development Standards to maintain the cities support for urban-ism, and making sure they were only working with sustainable business, that would be maintain the integrate and support for the long run not just through the hype. They have had to decline buisness like Taco Bell and several convenience stores.
I was also interested in the entertainment and tourism that was already booming and the projects weren’t even 50% complete. Halfway through the presentation I started planning my family summer events in Fort Worth.
Anticipated Bypass - Similar to the River Walk

Anticipated Bypass – Similar to the River Walk

coyote-pr-header july4th rock the river

Amari Roskelly, LEED AP, Jacobs Engineering

A Little About LEED with Amari Roskelly

 

The Layers of Sustainability are like peeling apart the layers of an onion

The Layers of Sustainability are like peeling apart the layers of an onion

Sustainability Coordinator at Jacobs Engineering

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Sustainability Intern at Jacobs Engineering
Sustainability Grad Student at UTA
Simulation Inventory Specialist at The University of Texas at Arlington
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The University of Texas at Arlington
The University of Texas at Arlington-Amarillo College

  •  LEED is a green building tool that addresses the entire building lifecycle recognizing best-in-class building strategies.
  • LEED is a program that provides third-party verification of green buildings. Building projects satisfy prerequisites and earn points to achieve different levels of certification
Third-party certification verifies that your project is designed, built and operating the way it was intended. It is also your first step toward managing your building through its entire lifecycle.

Third-party certification verifies that your project is designed, built and operating the way it was intended. It is also your first step toward managing your building through its entire lifecycle.

 

 

EED buildings are helping them thrive. An investment in LEED equals a lifetime of returns. LEED-certified buildings cost less to operate, reducing energy and water bills by as much as 40%. Businesses and organizations across the globe use LEED to increase the efficiency of their buildings, freeing up valuable resources that can be used to create new jobs, attract and retain top talent, expand operations and invest in emerging technologies. LEED-certified buildings give back. LEED certification increases property values and LEED buildings have faster lease-up rates and may qualify for a host of incentives like tax rebates and zoning allowances.

EED buildings are helping them thrive. An investment in LEED equals a lifetime of returns.
LEED-certified buildings cost less to operate, reducing energy and water bills by as much as 40%. Businesses and organizations across the globe use LEED to increase the efficiency of their buildings, freeing up valuable resources that can be used to create new jobs, attract and retain top talent, expand operations and invest in emerging technologies.
LEED-certified buildings give back. LEED certification increases property values and LEED buildings have faster lease-up rates and may qualify for a host of incentives like tax rebates and zoning allowances.

 

 

Sustainability for Military Bases – Fort Carson

https://www.facebook.com/SustainableMountainPost

Fort Carson will strive to become self-sustaining under a designation of "net zero" assigned by the Department of Defense. The only other overall net-zero base, meaning all services from power to water are included, is Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas.

Fort Carson will strive to become self-sustaining under a designation of “net zero” assigned by the Department of Defense. The only other overall net-zero base, meaning all services from power to water are included, is Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas.

 

The Net Zero energy designation will require Fort Carson to produce as
much energy on site as it uses. This will require aggressive
conservation and efficiency efforts, including finding ways to capture
and use waste energy and pursuing more renewable energy initiatives.

Operating as a net zero water installation, for example, means the
Mountain Post will conserve and re-purpose water. One way to achieve
this goal is to reuse gray water generated from showers and laundries
for irrigation of lawns and trees.

Additionally, Fort Carson will reduce, reuse and recover waste.
Converting appropriate waste materials into usable resources will
ultimately reduce and eliminate much of the need for costly landfill
disposal.

 

 

SOME INTERESTING LINKS:

http://www.estidama.org/

  • This rating system pays more attention to the social aspects of sustainability and is utilized globally.

The aim of the Pearl Community Rating System (PCRS) is to promote the development of sustainable communities and improve quality of life. The PCRS encourages water, energy and waste minimization, local material use and aims to improve supply chains for sustainable and recycled materials and products.

http://living-future.org/lbc

  • Encourages more self sufficient improvements
  • Several principals were derived for LEED standards
  • Concentrates on environmental impacts of development along with sustainable development

It calls for the creation of building projects at all scales that operate as cleanly, beautifully and efficiently as nature’s architecture. To be certified under the Challenge, projects must meet a series of ambitious performance requirements, including net zero energy, waste and water, over a minimum of 12 months of continuous occupancy

BRIT-LEED Platinum Building (tour)

Tour Guide - Chuck Boswor

Tour Guide – Chuck Bosworth

Under the LEED rating system for new construction, BRIT’s headquarters was awarded 56 points.  USGBC rating system requires a score of 52 or higher to achieve its platinum rating.  The headquarters is the first building in Tarrant County to achieve the Platinum rating, the second in North Texas, and the eighth in the state of Texas.   The 70,000-square-foot, two-story building is situated on 5.2 acres.  The building’s estimated energy savings is approximately $37,000 per year, which is 50 percent higher than energy code recommendations.  A key contributor to the impressive energy savings is BRIT’s 52-kilowatt photovoltaic system mounted on the roof of BRIT’s Archive Block.  The system supplies approximately 14 percent of the buildings annual energy requirements.  Using captured rainwater from the roof and hardscape, BRIT has reduced potable water usage for irrigation by 95 percent.  In addition, by using low-flow fixtures and other water conservation measures in the building it has achieved a 51 percent water savings.

Under the LEED rating system for new construction, BRIT’s headquarters was awarded 56 points. USGBC rating system requires a score of 52 or higher to achieve its platinum rating. The headquarters is the first building in Tarrant County to achieve the Platinum rating, the second in North Texas, and the eighth in the state of Texas.
The 70,000-square-foot, two-story building is situated on 5.2 acres. The building’s estimated energy savings is approximately $37,000 per year, which is 50 percent higher than energy code recommendations. A key contributor to the impressive energy savings is BRIT’s 52-kilowatt photovoltaic system mounted on the roof of BRIT’s Archive Block. The system supplies approximately 14 percent of the buildings annual energy requirements. Using captured rainwater from the roof and hardscape, BRIT has reduced potable water usage for irrigation by 95 percent. In addition, by using low-flow fixtures and other water conservation measures in the building it has achieved a 51 percent water savings.

MY PASSION

SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS- MY PASSION

Creative ideas for Natural Meeting Spaces ___they placed logs and log chairs around trees for people to gather and relax.

Creative ideas for Natural Meeting Spaces
—-They placed logs and log chairs around trees for people to gather and relax.

Commercial/Industrial Rain Collecting System

Commercial/Industrial Rain Collecting System

Wall- made from wood cypress from the Mississippi River

Wall- made from wood cypress from the Mississippi River

The building was designed on a natural slope for rain runoff. Designed with 150 catches, including plants that run off into streets and street drains. The water catches are designed to divert rain run off into the institutes prairie.

The building was designed on a natural slope for rain runoff.
Designed with 150 catches, including plants that run off into streets and street drains.
The water catches are designed to divert rain run off into the institutes prairie.

Windows are glare free, for subdued lighting to reduce energy usage by 75%

Windows are glare free, for subdued lighting to reduce energy usage by 75%

Living wall supports 3 types of vines that took a while to finally take off due to unexpected drought

Living wall supports 3 types of vines that took a while to finally take off due to unexpected drought

  Biomimicry- Taking land or species known to lands elsewhere and bringing them in and mimicking their habitat.   The WHITE CAMERA- creates 360 shots of the area to help maintain the prairie.

Biomimicry-
Taking land or species known to lands elsewhere and bringing them in and mimicking their habitat.
The WHITE CAMERA- creates 360 shots of the area to help maintain the prairie.

Credit for Innovation in Design,by combining 2 buildings. This photo shows where the institute connects with the Library and Labs

Credit for Innovation in Design,by combining 2 buildings. This photo shows where the institute connects with the Library and Labs

White Roof helps keep the building cool. With Solingical PV System

White Roof helps keep the building cool.
With Solingical PV System

BIRT solar Info

Largest archive of plants in Texas

Largest archive of plants in Texas

Herbatorium

Herbatorium

Tarrent Reginal Water Distric (re-visit)

Tarrant Regional Water District

Tarrant Regional Water District

I got a chance to visit the Tarrant Reginal Water District, and unlike the last visit I got a chance to see their control room, while Laura discussed their coverage area.

Since I wasn’t busy taking pictures on this tour I heard some really interesting facts about their new facility:

  • Waste Water is being recycled through a 200 acre wet land treatment system
  • 1.47 Million Solar array (powers 50-70% of the buildings usage)
  •               Repaid in 16-18 years
  •               Since the water district is a govt. building it was important for them to look into long term improvements with little environmental impacts
  • The control room is comprised of several monitors, constantly monitoring the counties lakes and public water usage
  • Since water is becoming scares and expensive to move around the water district is working on ways of reducing costs to its community.

I appreciated that the Water District had created several indicatives to encourage it’s employees to practice sustainable working habits, that support environmental improvements.

Concrete counter tops make with Beeswax

Concrete counter tops make with Beeswax

Mill work enhances air quality

Mill work enhances air quality

Low Flow Sinks

Low Flow Sinks

Florescent Lighting on Essential Programming

Florescent Lighting on Essential Programming

Rik Adamski, Tactical Urbanism (Presentation at UTA)

Rik Adamski, was the Streetscape Team Leader on the embRACE theSTREET Better Block project, in Fort Worth’s Near Northeast Side. He is currently spearheading a large-scale “Incremental Urbanism” project for SteerFW, Mayor Betsy Price’s young leader initiative for the City of Fort Worth. He has also guest lectured on the subject of Tactical Urbanism at University of Texas at Arlington.   Rik earned his Masters Degree in Urban Planning and Policy from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a BA in Sociology from the University of Cincinnati. He has over ten years experience in the real estate and planning industries and currently, is a Senior Planner for Bowman-Melton, Associates, a Dallas-based firm, which specializes in pedestrian and bicycle planning.

Bio complements of Texas A&M : http://calendar.tamu.edu/?&eventdatetime_id=14700

Rik- Tacktical Urbanism

I got a chance to attend the presentation presented by Rik Adamski, at the University of Arlington. I’ll admit wasn’t really looking foward to the presentation, but I learned it was my ignorance because I had NOOO idea what Tactical Urbanism was.

Catreana:

How dose Tactical Urbanism differ from these New Urbanism developments, which I see as building these mini communities that don’t require transportation because everything is in walking distance, and these communities are designed to be completely sustainable amongst themselves and its residents.

Rik:

Tactical urbanism helps citizen activists transform their own communities and educate others about how urban interventions can lead to long-term change in the quality and function of an urban space. Participants will gain knowledge on: The range of tactics available for different purposes, How to plan an intervention, How to identify a site for an urban intervention, How to gain the proper permissions for staging an intervention, How to recruit participants, How to recruit sponsors and donors.

The challenge is teaching some to live on less, and how to use less resources ~ Rik Adamski

You have to put a little pressure on cities by demonstrating … Show them urbanism can also be fun ~Rik Adamski

The First Better Block, Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas Photos Snipped from Youtube Video Created by Doug Costin

The First Better Block, Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas
Photos Snipped from Youtube Video Created by Doug Costin

The First Better Block, Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas Photos Snipped from Youtube Video Created by Doug Costin

The First Better Block, Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas
Photos Snipped from Youtube Video Created by Doug Costin

Photo Snipped from Alex Denham - The Planning Observer

Photo Snipped from Alex Denham – The Planning Observer

My Thoughts:

I hate to always be criticizing these communities, but what drives me nuts is that these communities are built based on what the developer thinks a particular community needs, granted yes I understand they do extensive surveys and lots of neighborhood meetings to determine what a particular New Urban Community needs. It just keeps resulting in a serious imbalance.

Plus one reason we have so many cars on the roads is due to individuals who want diversity, and options. They want options in work location, entertainment ect.

The imbalance, meaning you have these New Urban Communities where the developer decided to bring in organic grocery stores, upscale salons and retail stores. Then you have the other neighborhoods that are developed with several multifamily properties with culturally based grocery stores (El Rigio/Alde) and school buses that transport the children to overcrowded schools across town. I get it if you don’t like that communities features find another community, but that’s why we have land locked cities and rapid sprawling.

Community Supported Initiatives The message on the concrete reads: This is how I build a better block. The First Better Block, Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas Photos Snipped from Youtube Video Created by Doug Costin

Community Supported Initiatives
The message on the concrete reads:
This is how I build a better block.
The First Better Block, Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas
Photos Snipped from Youtube Video Created by Doug Costin

Community Supported Initiatives The First Better Block, Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas Photos Snipped from Youtube Video Created by Doug Costin

Community Supported Initiatives
The First Better Block, Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas
Photos Snipped from Youtube Video Created by Doug Costin

Community Supported Iinitiatives Bringing Back Block-Parties The First Better Block, Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas Photos Snipped from Youtube Video Created by Doug Costin

Community Supported Iinitiatives
Bringing Back Block-Parties
The First Better Block, Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas
Photos Snipped from Youtube Video Created by Doug Costin

After the presentation I now understand:

The beautiful thing about DYI Urbanism, it’s completely driven by the citizens in that community. Tactical Urbanism gives communities tactics to empower community residents and leaders to do different DYI improvements, giving the residents a sense of ownership over their community that will lead to more creative and innovative new urban development ideas.

When it comes to Tactical or New Urbanism, Social Sustainability must come first. I now have a lot of respect for Tactical Urbanism because it takes into account what a lot of organizations are leaving out. I think any type of development is pointless without empowering community residents not just community leaders>> community residents. If you’re not empowering local residents to maintain and continue to grow and improve there communities, we will continue to have sprawling.

I think it’s important that organizations and leaders (Chamber of Commerce’s, Habitat for Humanity’s, Local ISDs ect.) really consider working with neighborhood residents on DIY Projects.  These projects will highlight their communities, and if done well will create enough buzz that will encourage to developers taking a second look at their communities for improvements. Then they wouldn’t have to beg Wal-Mart’s to build in their communities and cross their fingers that other business will jump on the Wal-Mart Affect.

My opinion again, but sprawling comes from developers who don’t want to take the time or energy to encourage local residents to make changes. So these developers choose to develop in areas they know they can implement 80% of their own ideas.

Here’s me being a devil’s advocate but I really don’t blame these developers.

Bike racks made form palates Photo from Riverside, Racestreet Fort Worth  Build a Better Block Project

Bike racks made form palates
Photo from Riverside, Racestreet Fort Worth
Build a Better Block Project

DYI Projects  Photo smipped from Raise the Hammer - Tactical Urbanism http://www.raisethehammer.org/article/1849/invigorating_tactical_urbanism_talk_inspires_action

DYI Projects
Photo smipped from Raise the Hammer – Tactical Urbanism
http://www.raisethehammer.org/article/1849/invigorating_tactical_urbanism_talk_inspires_action

Creative Awareness or Street Damage and Potholes. DYI Projects  Photo smipped from Raise the Hammer - Tactical Urbanism http://www.raisethehammer.org/article/1849/invigorating_tactical_urbanism_talk_inspires_action

Creative Awareness or Street Damage and Potholes.
DYI Projects
Photo smipped from Raise the Hammer – Tactical Urbanism
http://www.raisethehammer.org/article/1849/invigorating_tactical_urbanism_talk_inspires_action

Interesting Links Mentioned:

http://www.bcworkshop.org/bcW/

The Building Community Workshop is a Dallas based nonprofit community design center seeing to improve visibility and viability of communities through the practice of thoughtful design and making. We enrich the lives of citizens bringing design thinking to areas of our city where resources are most scarce. To do so the BCWorkshop recognizes that it must first understand the social, economic and environmental issues facing a community  before beginning work.

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Dallas Habitat for Humanity

http://www.dallasareahabitat.org/web/guest/unlockthedreamtour

Upcoming Unlock the Dream Tours:

We hold our one-hour tours on the 2nd Wednesday and the 4th Thursday of each month.  To confirm a tour date & time for you and/or any friends, co-workers or family, please fill out the following form.  A confirmation email will be sent to you with further details.

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Build a Better Block

http://betterblock.org/

The “Better Block” project is a demonstration tool that acts as a living charrette so that communities can actively engage in the buildout process and provide feedback in real time

Live Oak Music Hall & Lounge

Image

old South Side Lions Club Community Center building

Smith plans to have four distinct areas in the spruced-up old Southside Lions Club hall. A ’50s-era lounge up front, with a small space available for acoustic performers: “I want it to be a true, relaxing lounge,” he says. “I want people to be able to answer their cell phones without having to run outside.” The main music hall, which Smith says will seat either 300 or 350, depending upon how he ends up configuring the space, will play host to “some big names,” he says, name-checking the likes of Fleet Foxes, Robert Earl Keen and Lucinda Williams. (Although there may be the occasional band reminiscent of Lola’s Saloon or the Where House, Smith says those more indie acts will likely be the exception, rather than the rule.) According to Smith, the lounge/music hall layout will be reminiscent of Dallas’ Gypsy Tea Room (now the Door), with clearly defined boundaries between areas.

Newly renovated Live Oak Music Hall & Lounge

2627 Jeffries, Dallas, Texas 75215

2627 Jeffries, Dallas, Texas 75215. Listing ID 17725193

This Blog page was created to analyze and support the potential investment of a multi-family property located in the

Fair Park District in Central Dallas.

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Executive Summary

I decided to do a Real Estate Analysis of a seasoned multi-family property located near the Fair Park area.  What attracted me to this property was its location, the Fair Park Area is an older community located in Central Dallas and has been slowly undergoing a slow transformation.  The Dallas Economic Development just complete phase one of their long-term efforts to attract new businesses and residents.

This property recently passes its city code inspection, and had its roof remodeled in 2009. It has also had its foundation leveled this year in 2012. It is an 8 unit apartment complex with 100% occupancy. It has a gross rental income of $4,240, additional expenses of $14,000 and a NOI of $34,080.  Interestingly with 100% occupancy it has a fairly high Cap Rate of 17%.

 Property Description

4,800sq.ft. Milti-family low-rise garden property with 2 floors

  • Built on 7500.00 acres
  • 8 units- all 2 bedrooms/1bathroom
  • Ceramic tile
  • Tenants pay electric
  • Located near new Dart Rail
  • Gross income of 3800/month

Financial Analysis

This property can be acquired at a 17% Cap Rate, using the income statement of  May 2012.

  • Asking Price $199,OOO
  • Down Payment $ 50,000
  • 30 year Note $ 160,000
  • Amortization – 2o Years
  • Balloon – 3 Years
  • Interest – 9.5%
  • Monthly PI Payment $1,491.41

Market Analysis

Since the year 2000 real property value has increased in the Southern Dallas region by 3.62B or 53.6%.  The Southern Dallas Area is continuing to grow including new condominium, several town homes, and the addition of a new police head quaters.

Median Age: 35.1%     Sizes of Households: 2.4 people     

Average Adjusted Gross Income: 22,524

Average of Women to Men and Racial Population

Percentage of Renters in 75215 vs State Average

Conclusion

After careful analysis of the areas market, the properties income statements, and projected cash flow I feel this property would be a good first time infestment. The remainder of this blog will present a break down of the research that went into the dession to possibly invest in this property.

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Click Image to View Larger

Financial Analysis

Bishop Arts District (Site Visit)

Today I got a chance to relieve some much needed academic stress I had lunch at Gloria’s with my classmates across the street from my favorite Taco Stand In Bishop Arts District. Then we got a chance to window shop and adventure in and out of some of the stores there. Bishop Arts Distinct is so beautiful now. It was interesting to see all the people walking around. It reminded me of the old Deep Elem. There were people everywhere. The district was so vibrant. This is what community/streets should feel like.

Throughout my studies I’ve heard all these theories about how a community and neighborhoods should look and feel like, but I guess it just depends on who you ask. Even though I hate Oak Cliff I would love to move closer to the District. This week I heard someone say what’s so great about Bishop Arts District; it’s nothing but a bunch of restaurants. I almost fell out of my seat. How can they say that. Obviously they don’t know oak cliff, because there are no decent restaurants with patio seating anywhere else in Oak Cliff.

I’m studying Adaptive Reuses right now and Bishop Arts District is a true reuse. Remembering old Bishop Arts District is I was bracing myself to walk in and out of a ton of antique stores, I was sooo wrong. For this blog I’m just going to post a few pictures.

Favorite Taco Stand in Dallas sorry Fuel City

This dude has a shop in Bishop Arts District… He makes these metal vest , metal masks and other stuff.

I just wanted to show how some was attempting Vertical gardening along the side of their building. You can see the string, where they’re training it up the building.

My classmate Beatris, made a good point, she pointed out that one of the buildings was two toned. We also noticed some updated wiring connected to this building.
We wondered if some of the buildings had been given face lift, but I don’t think the recent developers have done any such restorations. I bet if we dig deeper into this buildings history, we’ll find out that some previous owners of that particular building may have tried to give it a face lift. From my understanding there are now strict clauses in the leases preventing the tenants from making specific changes.

This is just another shot of Enos, the two toned building.

Sorry this picture wasn’t to clear, but I thought it was nice that they had added bike stations and respect bike rider signs.

lol… Me and my classmates tried to figure out what they would convert this building into … someone mentioned another restaurant. I suggested dry cleaners. But given the large open doors on the side, U shaped drive, it’s going to interesting to see who buys it (if it’s not already bought ) and see what adaptive reuse they will make of it.

I can’t remember what this building used to be, but it was recently converted into a dinner If you look closely you can see the window panes open like a roach coach (sorry I couldn’t think of a better way to explain) but the point is this building was really small on the inside but due to their creative seating they were able to add 10-15 extra chairs around the exterior of the restaurant. I also added this photo, because it was just another display of all the people finally hanging out in Bishop Arts District.

I tried to get a better view of this restaurant.. So you could see the interior.

I took this photo when some one pointed out that the develpoers left the trees to shade the side walks. Plus I like the way it brought out the colors in the buildings.

Super Cute >> They kept this >>> Don’t ask why I added this picture>> Just thought it was cool to see it

People every where… this is how a community/neighborhood should feel.