Trinity River Vision Authority- Shannon Cate

This morning I got a chance to visit with Shannon Cate, about the improvement being done along the Trinity River.

shanna-cate

Planning and Development Manager

 Shanna Cate has worked in planning on the Trinity River Vision project since May of 2004. She manages aspects related to urban planning and development, TRVA’s Fair Contracting program and coordinates a broad range of activities related to stakeholder, community and governmental relations.
Education
University of North Texas Denton, Texas, Master of Science Degree in Real Estate (August, 2005)
Tarleton State University, Stephenville, Texas, Bachelors of Business Administration Degree: Marketing Major (May, 2002)
Trinity Plan

Three bridges will span the bypass channel providing vehicles and pedestrians with access between Uptown and Northside neighborhoods.

1.5-mile-long bypass channel will be constructed to redirect flood waters around the low lying area to the north of downtown.

  • Because the bypass channel will be carrying water so quickly in times of flooding, areas where water can be stored before moving downstream will be critical. This is where valley storage comes into play. Valley storage is constructed to hold various amounts of water for short periods of time while river levels regulate after a flood.
  • Three flood gates will be installed at the portions of the river where the bypass channel and the original river intersect. These gates will remain open at most times, but can be shut during high water events – forcing water through the bypass channel.
  • A dam will be put in place near Samuels Ave. keeping the upstream water at a constant level at all times. The dam will also have a channel lock component allowing boats to travel from Marine Creek in the Stockyards all the way to Trinity Park!
Flooded homes near downtown Fort Worth in the 1949 Flood of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. Montgomery Wards department store is seen in the distance. A horse is on one of the rooftops.
Flooded homes near downtown Fort Worth in the 1949 Flood of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. Montgomery Wards department store is seen in the distance. A horse is on one of the rooftops.
Infrastructure needed for flood control will restore an aging industrial area once devoted to oil refining, scrap metal yards and electrical and chemical plants. When the bypass channel is completed, around 800 acres of underutilized land between the Tarrant County Courthouse and Northside Dr. will be accessible for private mixed-use development opportunities – in essence doubling the size of downtown. An envisioned 10,000 housing units and three million square feet of commercial, retail and educational space will make it possible for Fort Worth residents to live, work, play and learn near the river.
The Trinity Uptown plan will provide approximately 10 additional miles of pedestrian trails in the project area. These new trails will provide connectivity to existing trails and create linkages with neighborhoods and cultural amenities. The addition of new trails is concentrated largely along the east and west sides of the bypass channel and adjacent to the urban lake feature. The east side of the proposed bypass channel is envisioned as a “hard” edge with upper- and lower-level pedestrian walkways. These walkways will be hard surfaced and used for a variety of activities including walking, jogging, bicycling, and roller-blading. The west or “soft” edge of the bypass channel will be designed as a park-like natural setting with trails along a greenbelt. Picnic areas, park benches and landscaping will be used along the trails to create a place for the public to connect to the river and the environment. Trails are also planned in this section of greenbelt for horseback riding, and pedestrian bridges are proposed to provide easy access to the trail system.
What interested me the most:
Shannon mentioned they were creating Development Standards to maintain the cities support for urban-ism, and making sure they were only working with sustainable business, that would be maintain the integrate and support for the long run not just through the hype. They have had to decline buisness like Taco Bell and several convenience stores.
I was also interested in the entertainment and tourism that was already booming and the projects weren’t even 50% complete. Halfway through the presentation I started planning my family summer events in Fort Worth.
Anticipated Bypass - Similar to the River Walk
Anticipated Bypass – Similar to the River Walk
coyote-pr-header july4th rock the river
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BRIT-LEED Platinum Building (tour)

Tour Guide - Chuck Boswor
Tour Guide – Chuck Bosworth
Under the LEED rating system for new construction, BRIT’s headquarters was awarded 56 points.  USGBC rating system requires a score of 52 or higher to achieve its platinum rating.  The headquarters is the first building in Tarrant County to achieve the Platinum rating, the second in North Texas, and the eighth in the state of Texas.   The 70,000-square-foot, two-story building is situated on 5.2 acres.  The building’s estimated energy savings is approximately $37,000 per year, which is 50 percent higher than energy code recommendations.  A key contributor to the impressive energy savings is BRIT’s 52-kilowatt photovoltaic system mounted on the roof of BRIT’s Archive Block.  The system supplies approximately 14 percent of the buildings annual energy requirements.  Using captured rainwater from the roof and hardscape, BRIT has reduced potable water usage for irrigation by 95 percent.  In addition, by using low-flow fixtures and other water conservation measures in the building it has achieved a 51 percent water savings.
Under the LEED rating system for new construction, BRIT’s headquarters was awarded 56 points. USGBC rating system requires a score of 52 or higher to achieve its platinum rating. The headquarters is the first building in Tarrant County to achieve the Platinum rating, the second in North Texas, and the eighth in the state of Texas.
The 70,000-square-foot, two-story building is situated on 5.2 acres. The building’s estimated energy savings is approximately $37,000 per year, which is 50 percent higher than energy code recommendations. A key contributor to the impressive energy savings is BRIT’s 52-kilowatt photovoltaic system mounted on the roof of BRIT’s Archive Block. The system supplies approximately 14 percent of the buildings annual energy requirements. Using captured rainwater from the roof and hardscape, BRIT has reduced potable water usage for irrigation by 95 percent. In addition, by using low-flow fixtures and other water conservation measures in the building it has achieved a 51 percent water savings.
MY PASSION
SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS- MY PASSION
Creative ideas for Natural Meeting Spaces ___they placed logs and log chairs around trees for people to gather and relax.
Creative ideas for Natural Meeting Spaces
—-They placed logs and log chairs around trees for people to gather and relax.
Commercial/Industrial Rain Collecting System
Commercial/Industrial Rain Collecting System
Wall- made from wood cypress from the Mississippi River
Wall- made from wood cypress from the Mississippi River
The building was designed on a natural slope for rain runoff. Designed with 150 catches, including plants that run off into streets and street drains. The water catches are designed to divert rain run off into the institutes prairie.
The building was designed on a natural slope for rain runoff.
Designed with 150 catches, including plants that run off into streets and street drains.
The water catches are designed to divert rain run off into the institutes prairie.
Windows are glare free, for subdued lighting to reduce energy usage by 75%
Windows are glare free, for subdued lighting to reduce energy usage by 75%
Living wall supports 3 types of vines that took a while to finally take off due to unexpected drought
Living wall supports 3 types of vines that took a while to finally take off due to unexpected drought
  Biomimicry- Taking land or species known to lands elsewhere and bringing them in and mimicking their habitat.   The WHITE CAMERA- creates 360 shots of the area to help maintain the prairie.
Biomimicry-
Taking land or species known to lands elsewhere and bringing them in and mimicking their habitat.
The WHITE CAMERA- creates 360 shots of the area to help maintain the prairie.
Credit for Innovation in Design,by combining 2 buildings. This photo shows where the institute connects with the Library and Labs
Credit for Innovation in Design,by combining 2 buildings. This photo shows where the institute connects with the Library and Labs
White Roof helps keep the building cool. With Solingical PV System
White Roof helps keep the building cool.
With Solingical PV System

BIRT solar Info

Largest archive of plants in Texas
Largest archive of plants in Texas
Herbatorium
Herbatorium

Tarrent Reginal Water Distric (re-visit)

Tarrant Regional Water District
Tarrant Regional Water District

I got a chance to visit the Tarrant Reginal Water District, and unlike the last visit I got a chance to see their control room, while Laura discussed their coverage area.

Since I wasn’t busy taking pictures on this tour I heard some really interesting facts about their new facility:

  • Waste Water is being recycled through a 200 acre wet land treatment system
  • 1.47 Million Solar array (powers 50-70% of the buildings usage)
  •               Repaid in 16-18 years
  •               Since the water district is a govt. building it was important for them to look into long term improvements with little environmental impacts
  • The control room is comprised of several monitors, constantly monitoring the counties lakes and public water usage
  • Since water is becoming scares and expensive to move around the water district is working on ways of reducing costs to its community.

I appreciated that the Water District had created several indicatives to encourage it’s employees to practice sustainable working habits, that support environmental improvements.

Concrete counter tops make with Beeswax
Concrete counter tops make with Beeswax
Mill work enhances air quality
Mill work enhances air quality
Low Flow Sinks
Low Flow Sinks
Florescent Lighting on Essential Programming
Florescent Lighting on Essential Programming

HistoricTexas and Pacific Railroad Station Forth worth Texas

 

 

 

 

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A newer plan converted the building into lofts for sale and construction of a new low-rise apartment building to the east of the tower.  The lofts opened in July of 2006.  Commuter rail service started on December 3, 2001, serving as the western terminus of the Trinity Railway Express.

The Texas & Pacific Railroad merged with Missouri Pacific in 1963, and Mopac has long since been gobbled up by Union Pacific.

The station closed in 1967, when rail passenger service was taken over by Amtrak and relocated to a smaller station a few blocks away. Since then, the building has housed federal office space on the upper floors, but the lower levels have been mostly vacant.

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The main and women’s waiting rooms of this landmark building, built in 1931, were beautifully restored in 1999 and are available for party/wedding/event rental today.

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The T&P station project will be patterned after similar railroad-themed redevelopment projects in St. Louis, Philadelphia and Nashville, Tenn. 

Construction will cost about $50 million, and the developers are working on a public-private sector financing plan. Compared with building a new full-service hotel, the conversion of the historic railroad building is a bargain.

Tarrent County Water District (VISIT)

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 LEED Gold Certification

 Some of its features:

    • Largest roof top solar electric system in the state of Texas
    • Solar panels provide 70 percent of the buildings energy as well as it’s surplus electricity
    • Largest array of photovoltaic (electricity-generating) panels
    • Sealed concrete flooring, cork flooring
    • The lighting in the building operates with occupancy sensors
    •  Energy efficient heating/cooling system that continually cycles fresh air into the building

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Three 2,500-gallon cisterns to catch rainwater; a drip-irrigation system for landscaping featuring drought-resistant native vegetation

 This location was the Grand Daddy of all the locations we have visited. This building was Eco-Friendly to the max, but I think what impressed me most was how the design and thought process took the workers/employees into consideration. This building was designed to improve the overall air quality. The location took into consideration the Trinity Rail System. They really considered the people who would spend the most time in the building. They added a special coating on glass windows, so that the windows could double as think pads or dry erase boards (reducing paper and STICKY NOTES). It felt like the designers had thought about every thing.

I am really starting to understand the impact of LEED Certified Structures.

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